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How to Clean Sunglasses

By Kirsti Smouse

June 16, 2015

How to Clean Sunglasses

By Kirsti Smouse

June 16, 2015

And What You Shouldn’t Do

You are your sunglasses worst enemy.

If you’ve ever read a tutorial on how to clean sunglasses or lenses before, it probably started along the lines of “your sunglasses become dirty with daily wear.” This is true, yes. But stop for a minute.

What is that “dirt?”

It's dust and dirt from the trail. Grime from the road. Accumulated soil from the ocean and sea air. It's the inevitable by-product of an adventurous life spent outdoors. High-five to that—it's how your sunglasses should be getting dirty. But . . .

It’s also you.

It’s your dead skin cells. Grease from your pores. Oils from your hair. Sweat from your skin. Sunscreen you’ve lathered on your body. Make-up you’ve put on your face.

Now that we've acknowledged you've got a problem—

Let’s do something about it. Be the friend, not the foe.

For the everyday smudges, you may want to invest in a small bottle of lens cleaner and a lens cloth. Double-check that the lens cleaner is safe for all lens types. Some contain alcohol, which can strip mirror-coating from lenses, so make sure you know what you’re dealing with before you use it.

The Steps

For the stubborn spots, and to get all that grease and grime off your stems and nose pads, do the following:

  1. If you’re comfortable doing so, remove your lenses before you get started. This is probably easier than you think.
  2. Rinse your sunglasses under warm water—not too hot, not too cold.
  3. Use a mild dishwashing soap to wash all over your frames, working it in with your fingers. If necessary, use a microfiber cloth to dislodge heavier grime. Concentrate on areas that are heavily exposed to your skin — the nose bridge and the ends of your stems. A soft bristled toothbrush is ideal for cracks and crannies, especially the groove where the lens sits, as build-up is prone to occur there.
  4. Rinse off all the soap, dirt, and dust. Watch it swish satisfactorily down the drain.
  5. Dry your sunglasses thoroughly using a microfiber or lint-free cloth. If you use a towel, you may end up with lenses covered in towel fuzz. If you don’t want to repeat the whole process, go find a microfiber cloth.
  6. If your frames have additional rubber pieces that have taken the brunt of abuse, you may be able to remove those. The rubber often acts as a sponge, soaking up your sweat and oils, and will eventually become tacky. If they’re too late to salvage, you may be able to replace them with a new pair. Otherwise, run them through your next dishwasher’s cycle. If they are not removable, knead hand sanitizer into the rubber pieces to clean away the surface grime.

If you’d prefer to avoid the hassle of a sink and soap, or are on the road and this isn’t an available option, take a look at some high-quality lens cleaners. The special formula in Revant’s Cleaning Kit cuts through the grease, rather than just spreading around the oil and dust. The patent-pending ClearEdge™ Bag features a contoured edge, which lifts the dirt from every crevice, and the compact case makes it easy to store in a side pocket of a bag or in a glove compartment, so it’s always handy for when you’re tired of squinting through the smudges.

Revant ClearEdge™ Cleaning Kit

NEVER DO THESE THINGS

And since we're on the subject of treating sunglasses with care, consider refraining from the following activities:

  • Spit on your sunglasses. Or lick them. Just avoid all forms of saliva. First of all, this is just gross. It’s not terribly hygienic, and secondly, it doesn’t really work all that well.
  • Use ammonia, bleach, vinegar, or window cleaner on your sunglasses. You’re just not that dirty. If you wouldn’t immerse your body in a tub of ammonia, then your sunglasses don’t need it either. These chemicals will strip the coating off your lenses.
  • Rub your lenses with your t-shirt, sweatshirt, button-up, pajama bottoms, etc. Don’t use your clothing for anything but covering your body and making you more socially acceptable. Most of us don’t carry a lens cloth on our person at all times, so you’re probably going to do this anyway. Just know that all those tiny particles of dirt and dust hiding in your shirt may cause micro-scratches in your lenses. Don’t say we didn’t warn you.
  • Launder your microfiber cloth with fabric softener. Definitely clean your lens cloth to remove oil build-up, but the addition of fabric softener is a bad idea. It will destroy the effectiveness and durability of the fibers, and the fabric softener will leave a residue on your lenses.
  • Wipe, clean, dry, or rub your lenses with a paper towel, tissue, or any other form of paper product. Paper is made from trees. When’s the last time you encountered a soft tree? That tissue may feel soft, but it contains little particles of rough pulp, which will scratch your lenses.

Lastly, do yourself a favor and make this cleaning routine a regular event. A few minutes every few weeks will keep your sunglasses from accumulating so much gunk, and will extend the life of your sunglasses. You’ll also be able to see better, which is always a plus.

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